Funding for UK/EU students to do our Food MA

The MA in Food Security and Food Justice

The 2016/17 academic year will be the second year of our very successful MA in Food Security and Food Justice.  The programme is unique in a number of ways:

•International, interdisciplinary, and multi-scalar perspectives on the issues inherent when striving for food-security and food-justice.
•Professional and entrepreneurial skills and a work-based dissertation aimed at enhancing the employability of those wishing to go into employment after completion of the degree.
•Research training needed to pursue a PhD
•A core field course to Hong Kong (included in the fees), which allows students to contextualise their learning in a real location as well as engage with a variety of people and organisation located within the SAR.
•Flexible options that enable the student to shape their training in ways that suit their interests.

For more information about the MA please see: https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/geography/masters/foodma

The course also has a student blog and you can see what the students have to say here: https://foodsecurityfoodjustice.wordpress.com/what-we-think/

*NEW: Funding for UK/EU students*:

100 £10,000 scholarships are available for students starting a taught postgraduate course. The scholarships are for students who meet at least one of a selection of widening participation criteria (targeting groups under-represented at taught postgraduate level) and/or students who achieve a first in their undergraduate degree.

See:  http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/sps. Deadline: 22 May 2016.

Information for prospective students about our scholarships and the loans will be available at our Postgraduate Open Day on 11 February. All enquirers and applicants will be contacted over the coming days with the new funding information.

For more information: sheffieldscholars@sheffield.ac.uk

Neoliberalism and the making of food as waste–or–The need to reframe the debate from food waste to food surplus

I seem to do a lot of talks and in doing so sometimes this involves reshaping and thinking further about talks I have given in the past.  On Monday I presented at the Annual Symposium held by the Grantham Centre for Sustainable Futures at the University of Sheffield.  There were many papers that I felt sat well next to each other.  I particularly could see the synergies between my presentation and that of John Miller, who is in the English Department, who talked about natural capital and the humanities. Value was a central part of his discussion and I thought it well with my text.   This text is a revised version of what I presented earlier this year at West Town Farm as part of the IBG meetings.  
Continue reading

Food Matters and Neoliberalism: Talk Transcript for Food Matters Symposium

I recently participated in symposium that was considering waste in relation to food.  It was put on as a pre-conference event to the 2015 RGS/IBG meetings held in Exeter. The symposium, which took place on a working farm, was both fascinating and very engaging. You can find out more about the event and its participants on the web site developed by the organisers here.  I encourage you to have a look at the link as you will learn about West Town Farm and the activities of the day. My role at the symposium was to give a short talk around the issue of food waste and neoliberalism.  I chose to use an excellent food re-use project–The Real Junk Food Project–as a mechanism for focusing my questions. I am offering the text of my provocation in what follows.   Continue reading

What makes our Food Security and Food Justice MA distinctive

This autumn will be the inaugural year for the Food Security and Food Justice MA that I have been developing over the last 18 months.  The University of Sheffield has singled it out as being innovative and is using it as an example of good practice in its guidance for those wishing to start up an masters course.  To that end, there is a video of me talking about the course.  What got cut from the video was the discussion about the field course module that is a mandatory part of the course.  It is to Hong Kong and promises to be very exciting.

The 2015 general election and its implications for food insecurity in the UK.

On Friday, 8 May 2015 I awoke to discover that not only were we not looking forward to a new coalition government in the UK, but that the overall collapse of the Liberal Democrats and the Labour Party has given the Conservative government a mandate in UK politics. While I, at an individual level, am likely to see some benefits from the strong neoliberalism that underpins this government’s ideology, I am concerned by the implications of this for the country more generally and particularly the nation’s poor. Indeed, I see a further deepening of the division between those who have and those who have not. As I will elaborate, this will mean the continued exponential growth in the numbers of people requiring emergency food assistance and increased numbers of children and elderly with inadequate food supply, which will also translate into higher rates of obesity, diet rated illness and malnutrition. These trends as they are situated within the current climate of neoliberal austerity will also mean that we, if we are to continue as a nation with social values (as opposed to only economic values) must find ways of filling the gap, not just for families but also for our communities. Continue reading